Fresh FIction Box Not To Miss
Eileen Dreyer | The Risks and Rewards of Writing a Series
Author Guest / December 3, 2014

Mind you, I’ve never done this before. Write a series, that is. Not intentionally, anyway. I tend to discover secondary characters along the way as I write and realize they need a story. But that isn’t how it happened this time. This time I set myself up to write a trilogy about three women who become friends under the most trying of circumstances, The Battle of Waterloo. It was to be called The Three Graces, and I had it all plotted out. Well, I did until the second book, NEVER A GENTLEMAN, when Diccan, the hero, returns to his apartment to find eight other men draped over his furniture enjoying his brandy. You know that part about discovering secondary characters who need stories? Yeah. It was then that I realized that Drake’s Rakes, the informal group of aristocratic gentlemen I’d casually put together to protect England(I love nefarious spies), needed their own stories. Nine of them—well,  eight by this time. One, Jack was already taken in BARELY A LADY. I’d set out to write a trilogy about women and ended up with a—what is a group of ten, a decatet? What did I do now? The first thing I did…

Eileen Dreyer | When Romance Isn’t Easy
Author Guest / April 26, 2011

At different times I’m looking for different romances. When I’m working hard, or hip-deep in the problems brought to an Irish matriarch (sounds awful, doesn’t it?), I want something light, frothy. Regency romances, drawing-room comedies.  Barbara Metzger, Julia Quinn and the like. When I finish a bad deadline and I don’t have any words left of my own, I love beautifully written, poetic romances that linger long on the tongue.  Laura Kinsale,  Sherry Thomas. Or I might want romantic adventure, a la Patricia Veryan and Marsha Canham. But there are quite a few times, when what I really want is a good emotional wallow. I want to not just laugh, but sob. I want my chest to hurt, knowing that it’s safe to feel devastated for the characters, since I know that in the end,end all will be well. As a romance author, I write books the same way. I’ve been lucky enough to write all manner of romance in my career: contemporary and historical, issue books and comedies, adventure and suspense. Well, when Grace Fairchild walked onto the pages of BARELY A LADY, I knew she had to have her own story. There was something very special about her…

Fresh Pick | BARELY A LADY by Eileen Dreyer
Fresh Pick / September 20, 2010

Drake’s Rakes #1 July 2010 On Sale: July 1, 2010 Featuring: Jack Wyndham; Olivia Grace 432 pages ISBN: 0446542083 EAN: 9780446542081 Mass Market Paperback $6.99 Add to Wish List Romance Historical Buy at Amazon.com Barely A Lady by Eileen Dreyer She never stopped wanting him… Olivia Grace has secrets that could destroy her. One of the greatest of these is the Earl of Gracechurch, who married and divorced her five years earlier. Abandoned and disgraced, Grace has survived those years at the edge of respectability. Then she stumbles over Jack on the battlefield of Waterloo, and he becomes an even more dangerous secret. For not only is he unconscious, he is clad in an enemy uniform. But worse, when Jack finally wakes in Olivia’s care, he can’t remember how he came to be on a battlefield in Belgium. In fact, he can remember nothing of the last five years. He thinks he and Olivia are still blissfully together. To keep him from being hanged for a traitor, Olivia must pretend she and Jack are still married. To unearth the real traitors, Olivia and Jack must unravel the truth hidden within his faulty memory. To save themselves and the friends who…

EILEEN DREYER | A Villian To Love
Author Guest / July 27, 2010

I admit it. I love my villains. In fact, if I have a book with a villain in it, I have to make sure I have my villain in place before I consider my hero and heroine complete. Because, if you think about it, the way I show the heroism of my protagonists is to match them against an equal opposing force. And that force had better be three-dimensional and compelling in some way, or else it’s pointless. The way I usually put it when I’m teaching is that the villain has to be worthy of the hero, and vice versa. If there is one complaint I have when I read a book, it’s that the author doesn’t spend enough time or attention on the creation of their villains. It isn’t enough that a person is evil. So what? That isn’t interesting. The villain has to have a reason for doing what he(or she) does. It also has to be a compelling reason, at least to the villain. But here’s the secret. It’s the best advice I’ve ever gotten about villains. No villain is truly villainous in his own eyes. He always has what he considers to be a perfectly…